The Day I Decided to Stop Feeling Like a Social Media Hooker

Editorial Calendar - VIsual

I discovered last night that it’s NaBloPoMo. So I’m joining the rest of the nutjobs out there, blogging their hearts out one day at a time. I got a late start (It’s November 3rd), but better late than never. Also I could have retroactively published this post on Nov. 1st but that felt like cheating. I even created this colorful editorial calendar I taped to my closet door using pieces of paper I bought at an overpriced Swiss stationery shop in London. I had been “saving” them for some sort of perfect occasion that I think is now.

On Feeling Like a Social Media Hooker

The amount of energy I spend deciding whether or not to turn this into my full blog (I have one at Tumblr as well, and a Cowbird account…and I Tweet and use Instagram regularly) is absurd. I’m a social media specialist at a Manhattan digital marketing agency and I should have better control over my digital footprint. I feel like Julia Roberts in Pretty Woman when she justifies her job as a hooker by stating “I say who…I say when…I say who…” with no actual confidence or conviction behind the proclamation. That’s me. I’m a social media hooker. 

Facebook isn’t my network of choice. I love defriending people and clearing my social cache, and I don’t post pictures on Facebook often and never check Events. I falsely assumed this would make me  immune to social media overload, but I’m actually a slave to digital media. I’ve lost control. I’m too connected to my cell phone, my iPad, my laptop, my double monitors at the office. I know this is something many others can relate to, but it frustrates me on a personal level for some reason. I love writing, and communicating, but I get overwhelmed with the amount of content out there already and don’t know what the point is of adding more to the pile. Then I stop myself and think “But you’re a decent writer, and you have shit to say, and people like listening to the shit you say in real life…so you should blog.” Then the earlier voice pops back in saying “But what are you going to focus on?” Then I take a nap and decide to figure it out later.

Until now.

Last night I watched an incredibly inspiring talk by Darren Rowse, a professional blogger, on “Getting Dreams Out Of Your Head”. The following tidbits jumped out at me as solutions to the block I’m experiencing:

“The reality is that your next big thing might be the current small thing right in front of you.”

I love this. Darren spoke at length about “sparks” – little ideas that can grow into something magnificent if given enough oxygen and time to breathe.

Choose 1 small thing every day that will get you closer to your dream. Do it to the best of your ability. Not perfectly.

As a chronic perfectionist and over-achiever, this one slapped me in the face as well. It’s about picking one thing to focus on a day, actually doing it, and moving on to the next. I also read an article in the Times about Mindfulness and Meditation, the 30-year-old chief executive of Inward, a startup focusing on “positive lifestyle change”, stated that when he added fewer things to his to-do list, he was actually getting them done – and done well.

“Become obsessed with being useful.”

This one’s important and has the potential to make you, the blogger, successful. It’s about providing solutions to problems others have. I need to spend more time thinking about this one and deciding which approach I want to take here, because I have a hard time thinking of myself as a provider of solutions in a traditional sense. Sometimes I blame my literature background for my love of endlessly analyzing situations – whether it’s the theme in a movie, a topic of conversation, a campaign idea for a social media client…I like stirring the pot and encouraging ideas to brew to the surface. Most people who know me wouldn’t classify me as a “problem solver”, but I definitely do cause others to think of things in a new light and to become excited by the process. Hm. Will have to come back to this.

“Create space to observe”

Last but not least. I’m going to track my daily flow of energy; what did I do that gave me the most energy, and what took my energy away? I want to focus on doing more of the things that energize me and less of the things that drain me. Energy gain v. energy drain. Seems straightforward enough for me to jot this down daily without overanalyzing it too much (see previous paragraph).

This blog post is approaching the point of getting classified as an energy drain, so I’ll stop here. But am excited to give NaBloPoMo a shot…and to start getting some of my dreams out of my head.

8 thoughts on “The Day I Decided to Stop Feeling Like a Social Media Hooker

  1. There’s an energy drain in my home. It’s invisible and hard to find, but its’ days are numbered. Thanks for the motivation Zing! to search and destroy it, or transform it.

  2. Thank you for a really thoughtful and well written piece. I think what I like best about it, besides the links, is that what you (and he) are saying is so widely applicable. I appreciate the food for thought.
    BB

  3. Oh, man. This is right on time for me. I feel like a contortionist trying to navigate my personal best at utilizing social media. Your title caught my eye when I was linking up at NaBloPoMo. I’ll be following you this month. Thanks for this!

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